Course Selection Guide

 

 

 


 

Credit Types     

Honours & Distinction     

Learning Center/Resource

Advanced Placement         

N.S Graduation Requirements

Post-Secondary Admissions Requirements     

Credit Checker

French Immersion    

Options & Opportunities (O2)    

Skilled Trades

Course Offerings 2013-14    

N.S Virtual School    

Art     

Business 

English   

Family Studies, Personal Development and Career Studies

French Language   

Mathematics    

Physical Education       

Science

Social Studies         

Technology

 

Introduction

 

 

The information contained in this booklet has been prepared to help students choose the programs of studies best suited to their interests, abilities and future goals. Registration usually begins in February of each year. Guidance counsellors will initiate the process by meeting with students in a large group format, followed by the opportunity for individual sessions.  Counsellors will receive recommendations from classroom teachers for each student in Math, and English, and these recommendations should form the basis of course selections. In choosing remaining courses, it is important that students have carefully read the course descriptions in this book so that they make informed choices about other compulsory requirements and electives. Students will select courses in PowerSchool and parents are encouraged to review and discuss these selections with their child. Parental input is a very important component in this process, and we encourage you to contact the guidance counsellor if you have any questions or concerns. It is expected that the course selection process for incoming grade 9’s will be completed by the end of March, and for Grade 10’s and 11’s by the end of April.  The grade 9 parent meeting will be at J.L. Ilsley on February 21st at 7pm. 

 

 

AdditAdditional Notes

 

·                     In June, if a student receives a failing mark in a compulsory course, he/she will be automatically re-registered for that course for the following year. If the student then attends summer school, and passes, the course selection will be modified accordingly. 

·                     Schools are staffed based on the course selections made by students in the spring of each year.  Therefore we cannot make course changes for students in September, unless a student has a scheduling conflict or has a change in post-secondary plans.

·                     Due to low enrollment, certain courses may be cancelled.  In such situations the Guidance counsellor will choose from the student’s alternate course selections.

 

 

 

Contact Information for Guidance Counsellors

 

For current J.L. Ilsley students:

Surnames A-J:  Jarrett Feeney                   479-4612 ext 5          jfeeney@hrsb.ns.ca

Surnames K-Z: Peggy Furlong:                      479-4612 ext 6       pfurlong@hrsb.ca

 

Cunard Junior High: Sue MacKay                 479-4421                smackay@hrsb.ns.ca

Elizabeth Sutherland: Eva Rudderham          479-4434                ERudderham@hrsb.ca

Herring Cove Junior High: Judi Hutchison     479-4223                jhutchison@hrsb.ca

Rockingstone Junior High: Eva Doell             479-4664                edoell@staff.ednet.ns.ca

 

 

Credit Types

 

Advanced Placement

These courses are recognized by universities as being at a first year university level, and students may receive credit or advanced standing for high achievement in these courses. Please see page 4 for further details.

 

Advanced

Advanced courses are designed to meet the needs of students who have demonstrated an exceptional degree of academic ability or achievement, and are planning post secondary study at university or community college.

 

Academic

Academic courses are designed for students who wish to enter college, university or other post-secondary institutions.

 

Open

Although none of the open courses is designed to meet the specific entrance requirements of any post secondary institution, individual courses may meet entrance requirements of some institutions.

 

Graduation

Graduation courses are designed for students who wish to earn a graduation diploma with a view to proceeding to employment or some selected area of post secondary study.

 

Semestering

In a semestered school, the year is divided into two equal semesters.  The semesters run as follows:  Semester 1 September to January; Semester 2 February to the end of June.  During each semester, a student may take up to four courses.  Each semester ends with a final examination period.

 

In a semestered school, a student has each course every day.  Every effort will be made to balance the load of subjects between semesters.  Consult with your Counsellor if you have any timetabling concerns. 

 

Grade 12 students apply to post secondary institutions at the end of the first semester.  Please note that some Grade 11 marks are used by universities in conjunction with the Grade 12 marks to determine an admission average and award scholarships.

 

 

Criteria for Honours and Honours with Distinction

 

An academic awards evening is held in the fall to recognize the achievement of students from the previous year.  Certificates are awarded for honours, honours with distinction, and subject prizes.  In addition, a plaque with student names is placed in the school foyer.

 

To achieve honours, a student must maintain an average of 80%.  The average must include English and four other courses. No individual mark in any subject included in the average may be below 70%.  To achieve Honours with Distinction, a student must maintain an average of 90% in English and four other courses. No individual mark in any of the subjects included in the average may be below 80%.

Challenge For Credit And Independent Study

 

The challenge for credit process allows a school to recognize that a student has already acquired the skills, knowledge and attitudes that an existing course seeks to develop.  Challenge for credit may occur in fine arts, languages, mathematics and physical education.  In order for a challenge to be successful, it is expected that students’ extensive prior experiences have significant educational value and are directly aligned with the learning outcomes of the course being challenged.

 

Independent study credits help promote individualized programming and are not intended to replicate any existing course in the public school program. Please see your guidance counsellor for further details.

 

Course Load Requirements

 

Students are eligible to register for a total of 24 courses over a three year period.  The following are the minimum course load requirements.

bulletGrade 10 students must register for 8 courses per year, 4 in each semester.
bulletGrade 11 students must register for 7 courses per year (3 in one semester, 4 in the other).
bulletGrade 12 students must enroll in a minimum of 6 courses per year, 3 each semester
bullet Returning graduates will be accepted.  Course selection will be accommodated on course availability in September.

 

Course Selection

 

bullet All courses offered are conditional upon adequate enrollment.  It may also be necessary to limit the number of students in a course because of space, safety, and other factors.
bullet Course changes in September or throughout the year will be based on academic need and assessed on an individual basis only in exceptional circumstances.  Course selections in the spring for September should be considered final.  All students are expected to follow their second semester timetables for courses assigned in September.  Repeating failed courses in second semester should not be expected.
bullet It is the responsibility of the student to change his or her course level, if required, due to failure of a subject at the end of the year.  This should be done in June after picking up final marks and before leaving school. 
bulletBefore registering for courses, be sure you have the required approval and/or the recommended prerequisites.
bullet Students and parents are encouraged to use the services of School Counsellors, Department Heads, Subject Teachers, or Administration for information on course selection, career and educational opportunities, study skills, and other areas of concern.  Refer to the Nova Scotia Graduation Requirements section on page 5.
bullet Investigate the entrance requirements of your chosen post secondary institution:  Community College, University, etc., so that you register for the required subjects.  Please note that graduation from high school does not necessarily qualify a student to enter university or other institutions that offer professional training.  Specified prerequisites, both in courses and in standards (marks) in those courses may be required.

 

Resource Support/Learning Center

 

Resource staff at J. L. Ilsley High School are aware of the educational implications of various cognitive, sensory, physical, social and emotional factors that affect students.  They offer a service that provides assistance with course work and assignments as part of a student’s daily schedule.

The Resource classes and Learning Center also:

bulletProvide a “base” and advocacy for students with Individual Program Plans or students requiring course adaptations.
bulletAssist teachers in providing technology and materials to support Individual Program Plans and course adaptations for individual students.
bulletLiaise with all school departments to help ensure that student needs are met in the classroom.
bullet Participate in the ongoing communication process with parents and administration regarding achievement and attendance.

 

Advanced Placement (AP)

 

AP courses offer grade 12 students the opportunity to pursue university level studies while in high school.  These courses provide students with a challenging curriculum, and prepare them well for university studies.  The AP program has internationally recognized standards and therefore creates opportunities for students to be accepted into highly competitive programs.  Based on their performance in rigorous AP examinations held worldwide on set dates, students can earn credits or advanced placement at most universities in Canada and the US.  In our ongoing effort to provide enrichment opportunities for students, we offer Advanced Placement (AP) courses in AP English 12, AP Physics 12, AP Chemistry 12, AP Calculus 12, AP Biology 12 and AP Music Theory 12.  Students who are considering advanced placement in their grade 12 year must enroll in Pre-AP courses in grade 10 and 11.  For more information please check the website at www.apcentral.collegeboard.com or the Canadian Website:  www.ap.ca

 

What are the benefits of AP?

 

There are many benefits to taking AP.

Enrichment:  Challenge yourself with rigorous academic courses.

Flexibility:      Choose courses based on your academic strengths and interests.

Preparation:  Experience university-level expectations and content to help you prepare for university studies.

University Recognition:  Earn credit, advanced placement, or both, based on your performance on standardized, demanding AP examinations.

 

Who should enroll in AP courses?

 

·         Students who have a demonstrated record of achievement and a desire to attend university.

·         Students who have a willingness to meet the challenges of a rigorous academic course.

 

Consider the AP challenge if you’re ready to explore a subject in greater depth, learn to make connections with larger concepts, develop analytical reasoning skills, and form disciplined study habits that will contribute to your success at university.

Requirements

 

 

Nova Scotia Graduation Requirements

 

18 credits are required to graduate

·         13 of these are compulsory

o        3 English Language Arts (one at each grade level)

o        2 Mathematics (from two different grade levels)

o        2 Sciences (a “first science” credit and 1 other – see course descriptions)

o        1 Canadian History course (Canadian History 11, or  African Canadian Studies 11)

o        1 Global Studies (Global Geography 12, or Global History 12)

o        1 Physical Education (from Phys Ed 10, Physically Active Living 11,  Phys Ed 11,  or Phys Ed Leadership 12)

o        1 Fine Arts (Visual Arts, Drama, Music)

o        2 other credits from Technology, Mathematics or Science

·         No more that 7 of the 18 credits may be from courses coded as Grade 10 and at least 5 must be from courses coded as Grade 12.

·         Only one credit will be given for a course in the same subject at the same grade level, although both will show on the student transcript.  For example, if a student completes English Communications 12 and English 12, it will only count as one credit toward the 18 credits required for graduation.

 

Post-Secondary Admission Requirements

 

Listed below are the grade 12 courses required for several post-secondary programs.  It is important to check the specifics for each institution as they vary, especially outside Nova Scotia.

 

University Entrance Requirements

bullet Bachelor of Arts

English + 4 other academic courses

bullet Bachelor of Science

English, Pre-Calculus Math, 2 Sciences + 1 other academic course

bullet Bachelor of Commerce

English, Mathematics (in some cases Pre-Calculus) + 3 other academic courses

bullet Bachelor of Engineering

English, Pre-Calculus Math, Chemistry, Physics + 1 other academic course

Calculus is required for Science and Engineering in many universities outside of Atlantic Canada

bullet Bachelor of Computer Science

English, Pre-Calculus Math + 3 other academic courses

bullet Bachelor of Nursing

English, Math (academic) Chemistry, Biology + 1 other academic course

 

Community College Entrance Requirements

Grade 12 or equivalent (some programs have specific subject requirements, particularly in mathematics and science).  Please check admission requirements at nscc.ca for the Nova Scotia Community College.

 

Credit Check

 

The chart below will help you determine whether you are on the right path towards graduation.  Compare it with your “Three-Year-Plan” to ensure that you will meet the requirements to graduate.  On the space provided, write the name of the course that satisfies the requirement.

 

English 10

_____________________

 

English 11

_____________________

 

English 12

_____________________

Remember, Only seven Grade 10 credits may be used towards the 18 requirements.  Extra grade 10 credits should be listed below the dotted line.

First Mathematics

_____________________

Second Mathematics

_____________________

First Science 

(Science 10, Bio 11, Physics 11,Chem 11)

_____________________

Second Science

_____________________

One Social Studies-Canadian Content

_____________________

One Global Studies 12

_____________________

One Physical Education credit

_____________________

One Fine Arts

(Visual Arts, Music, Drama)

_____________________

 

First Technology

(Science, Math, Technology)

_____________________

Students must have a minimum of five grade 12 credits to graduate.  Most students have more than five grade 12 credits, especially those going on to university

Second Technology

(Science, Math, Technology)

_____________________

5 Grade 12 Credits

_____________________

 

_____________________

 

_____________________

 

_____________________

 

_____________________

 

Minimum Total is 18 Credits

Credits above and beyond 18

_____________________

 

 

_____________________

 

 

_____________________

 

 

_____________________

 

 

_____________________

 

 

_____________________

 

 

French Immersion Certificate

 

Students who have successfully completed grade 9 in a French Immersion program are eligible to continue their French Immersion studies in high school.  Junior High francophone students who would normally attend Ecole Carrefour but wish to consider J.L. Ilsley should meet with their guidance counsellor to discuss which option best meets their needs.

 

A  French Immersion certificate from N.S Dept of Education will be awarded to students who pass 9 academic credits in subjects taught in French (including French language arts in Grade10, 11, and 12).  Students who wish to obtain a French Immersion Certificate must take 5 French Immersion courses in Grade 10.  Students are required to take a minimum of two French Immersion courses per year.

 

The program of studies is outlined below:

 

Grade 10

Grade 11

Grade 12

Sciences 10F

Histoire 10F

Francais 10F

Art Dramatiques 10F

Histoire Canadien 11F

Francais 11F

Biologie 11F

Francais 12F

Histoire Planetaire 12F

 

 

 

Why Study French at High School?

 

·         By continuing in French Immersion in high school students are able to maintain and extend their French skills.  The French Immersion program is designed to maximize the time spent using French.

·         Research has shown that students who learn another language develop keen analytic, restructuring, and divergent thinking skills.

·         As the job market and the workplace change due to our global economy, it has become even more important to have a thorough knowledge of at least one other language.

·         Having proficiency in a second language gives students an advantage in the competitive job market, and more opportunity for upward mobility.  Research has shown that workers who speak both official languages earn more than those who speak only English or French.

·         We live in a country that is officially bilingual and the ability to converse in both official languages is definitely an asset.  It enhances one’s ability to participate fully in Canadian society.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Sample Course Path: French Immersion Students Interested in Post Secondary Bachelor of Science Programs.

Text Box: Semester 1 Text Box: Semester 2

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

*(Universities vary in terms of pre-requisites. Students must check the requirements of any prospective schools of interest.)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


O2:  Options and Opportunities

 

O2:  Options and Opportunities provides a comprehensive educational program that bridges high school to post-secondary education, work and /or youth apprenticeships for each student.  The program is about helping students make connections between what they are learning in school and post-secondary programs and/or work.  High school students who participate in the program get experience in a career academy and increased opportunities for community-based learning such as cooperative education credits. 

 

Students who graduate from O2 will have fulfilled all graduation requirements and earned a high school diploma.  In addition, they will have also graduated with a greater understanding of their skills, knowledge and strengths, and a career plan.

 

O2 builds on initiatives introduced through the Youth Pathways and Transitions strategy.  O2 program components are Community-Based Learning Partnerships, Skills for the Workplace, Career Academies, Integrated Career Education and Planning, Instructional Teaming, Expanded Course Options, Connecting with Families, and Head Start in the Trades.

 

O2 is a full high school program (10-12) and is available to students entering grade 10 who need additional help with career and educational planning.  Students must apply and participate, along with their families, in an admissions process.

Sample Course Path – Options and Opportunities 

Text Box: Semester 1 Text Box: Semester 2

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Skilled Trades Education

 

The active decision by a student to enter into the skilled trades as a career choice can result in a number of positive outcomes.  The skilled trades span many differing skillsets, so work choices are many.  Quality of life increases as good-paying jobs result in higher earning capacity.  There is the respect that comes from productive work and the professionalism that is required of skilled trades people.

 

Recognizing the importance of this option for our students, the Government of Nova Scotia committed in 2007 to “further expand choices for hands-on learning in the areas of vocational and composite programming.  When implemented, the new programming will offer students opportunities for trade-specific learning in the areas of metals, wood, plumbing and pipefitting, and electrical work.”

 

The Skilled Trades suite of courses and Skilled Trades Learning Centres are the beginning of the integration of the Skilled Trades in Nova Scotia’s Public Schools.

 

Below is a possible course map of the Skilled Trades suite of courses.

 

Organization Chart

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


COURSES OFFERED 2013-2014

Subject Area

Grade 10

Grade 11

Grade 12

English

English 10

 

English Communications 11

English 11

Adv English 11 (Pre AP)

 

English Communications 12

English 12

AP English 12

English 12 African Heritage

Mathematics

Math Essentials 10

Math at Work 10

Mathematics 10 (Full Year)

Mathematics Essentials 11

Mathematics Foundations 11

Mathematics 11

Adv Mathematics 11

Mathematics Foundations 12

Mathematics 12

Adv Mathematics 12

Pre-Calculus 12

AP Calculus 12

Science

Science 10

Biology 11

Adv Biology 11 (Pre AP)

Chemistry 11

Adv Chemistry 11 (Pre AP)

Human Biology 11

Oceans 11

Physics 11

Adv Physics 11 (Pre AP)

Biology 12

AP Biology 12

Chemistry 12

AP Chemistry 12

Geology 12

Physics 12

AP Physics 12

 

Social Studies

History 10

African Canadian Studies 11

Canadian History 11

Global Geography 12

Global History 12

Adv Global History 12

Sociology 12 (Academic)

Sociology 12 (Open)

French (Core)

Core French 10

Core French 11

Core French 12

French (Immersion)

Art Dramatique 10 Imm

Français Immersion 10

Histoire Ancienne 10 Imm

Sciences 10 Imm

Histoire Du Canada 11 Imm

Biologie 11 Imm

Français Immersion 11

 

Français Immersion 12

Histoire Planetaire 12 Imm

Fine Arts

Drama 10

Music 10

Music 10 Band

Music 10 Vocal

Visual Arts 10

Drama 11

Music 11 Band

Music 11 Vocal

Visual Arts 11

AP Music 12

Music 12 Band

Music 12 Vocal

Visual Arts 12

 

Family Studies/ Personal Development and Career Ed

Career Development 10

Community-Based Learning 10

Food for Healthy Living 10

International Foods 10

Child Studies 11

Career Development 11

Workplace Health & Safety 11

Cooperative Education 11

Canadian Families 12

Cooperative Education 12

 

Physical Education

Physical Education 10

 

Physically Active Living 11

Physical Education 11

Physical Ed Leadership 12

Business Education

Business 10

Accounting 11

Tourism 11

Business Management 12

Law 12

Investment and Finance 12

Technology and Skilled Trades

Construction Technology 10

Exploring Technology 10

Skilled Trades 10

Business Technology 11

Construction Trades 11

Production Technology 11

Transportation Trades 11

 

Business Technology 12

Film and Video 12

Math for the Workplace 12

Multimedia 12

Production Technology 12

Skilled Trades 12 Co-op

 

Please Note:  Courses listed above are not guaranteed to be scheduled.  Course offerings may be adjusted due to low enrollment requests, staffing considerations and/or changes dictated by the Halifax Regional School Board/NS Department of Education.

Nova Scotia Virtual School

The Nova Scotia Virtual School is a common provincial online learning platform created as a joint project between provincial school boards and the Department of Education in Nova Scotia. It provides for the delivery of public school and correspondence courses (Distributed Learning), online extensions of school-based classes (Blended Learning), and supports professional development and online meetings for teachers and other staff of school boards and the Department of Education (Professional Learning).

Research shows that students are most successful in online learning when they are self-motivated, autonomous learners who can resist distractions and work individually towards a learning goal. The courses that are currently o­ffered through the Nova Scotia Virtual School consist of a set of lessons, activities, and projects. It is expected that students will be online every day completing work and meeting with their teacher and fellow students.

Students must sign into their courses each day to complete lessons and assignments. Once a week, students will meet with their teacher and fellow students in an online video conference. Currently, you must be enrolled in a public high school in Nova Scotia to enrol in these to these online courses.

Please note that students should take a maximum of one (1) online course each semester.


The following courses will be available through the Nova Scotia Virtual School in the 2013-14 school year.  Full information will also be posted on the Nova Scotia Virtual School website at nsvs.ednet.ns.ca

 

Semester 1

Semester 2

Visual Arts 10

Film and Video 12 (PC)

Business Technology 11

Visual Arts 11 / Advanced Visual Arts 11

Film and Video 12 (MAC)

Multimedia 12 (MAC)

African Canadian Studies 11

Global Politics 12

 

Canadian History 11

Sociology 12

Tourism 11

 

Biology 11 / Advanced Biology 11

Chemistry 11 /

Advanced Chemistry 11

Chemistry 12 / Advanced Chemistry 12

Physics 11  / Advanced Physics 11

Global Geography 12 / Advanced Global Geography 12

Oceans 11

Geology 12

Océans 11 (Imm)

Introduction a la Lit. 12

 

Math 12

Advanced Math 12

Physics 12 / Advanced Physics 12

Advanced Math 12

Calculus 12

Calculus 12

Chimie 11 / Chimie 11 Avancée

Biologie 11 / Biologie 11 Avancée

 

Chimie 12 / Chimie 12 Avancée

Biologie 12 / Biologie 12 Avancée

Workplace Health and Safety 11

Workplace Health and Safety 11

Fitness Leadership 11

Global Politics 12

Accounting 12

Accounting 12

PreCalculus 12

Science 10

PreCalculus 12

PreCalculus 12

Science 10

Sociology 12

Entrepreneurship 12

Tourism 11

Sociology 12

Entrepreneurship 12

Advanced English 12

Advanced English 12

Canadian Families 12

Business Technology 11

 

 


ARTS EDUCATION

 

Education in the arts assists us in perceiving, analyzing and interpreting ourselves, our community, our environment and our cultural heritage.  The study of the arts provides the opportunity to see the world through the eyes of others.  It adds a new dimension to the students' abilities to see the world, perceive problems and take action towards their solution.  Art (the arts) mirrors and influences the human condition reflecting our origins, our history and our aspirations.

Education in the arts should be an essential part of the development of every child.  Participation in art, drama and music provides a unique mode of experience that stimulates creative and intuitive thought while developing the intellect.  Arts education assists in perceiving and responding to the environment through the senses.  It also helps in achieving self-discipline, experiencing success, and realizing personal potential.  Learning through the arts provides a fuller understanding and enjoyment of life.  It also provides opportunities for students to explore careers in the fine arts.

 

Grade Ten Courses

 

VISUAL ARTS 10

(ACADEMIC credit)

This first year of high school art is a foundation program intended to introduce students to the central components of fine art.  Emphasis will be placed upon skill development, material and tool manipulation, art theory and informal art history. Students will explore units in drawing, colour theory, painting and 3-D sculpture.

 

DRAMA 10

(ACADEMIC credit)

Drama 10 is an introductory course in drama focusing on the personal, intellectual, and social growth of the student.  Drama 10 provides a foundation for future course work in drama and theatre.  Through extensive work in improvisation, in both small and large groups, students gain confidence as they explore and communicate ideas, experiences, and feelings in a range of dramatic forms, such as dramatic movement and mime, dramatization, choral speech, choric drama, group drama and Readers Theatre.

 

Drama 10 comprises four components:  foundation, movement, speech, and theatre.  The foundation component, which focuses on building student confidence and trust and creating a supportive learning environment, introduces students to the essential elements of movement and speech.  Experiences in movement and speech are extended in the movement and speech components and combined in the exploration of the various dramatic forms.

 

ARTS DRAMATIQUES 10

(ACADEMIC credit)

Drama 10 is an introductory course designed for students who would like to learn more about both drama and theatre arts.  The course utilizes a self-developmental approach and begins with in-class exercises to develop concentration and self-confidence, imagination, openness and sensitivity.  It then moves to improvisation, work with scripted plays and some play writing.  Attendance at a number of performances outside the school may be required.

 

 

 

 

 

 

MUSIC 10

(ACADEMIC credit)

This course is offered to students who have some previous music experience, and who have access to an instrument at home.  Beginner students are accepted provided they are willing to learn basic skills on guitar or keyboard.  Other instruments may be an option at the discretion of the teacher.  This course covers music history, music theory (reading and writing music), ear training, and practical playing skills.  The class requires participation in class (playing and practicing), written assignments, and tests.  Students who are interested in this course should see their guidance counsellor for an information package.

 

MUSIC 10  (BAND)

(ACADEMIC credit)

Offered to students who have participated in band at the Junior High level.  Students who play "non-traditional" band instruments are also welcome (guitar, piano, strings) provided they have some previous experience or private study.  Guitar players must be at an intermediate level and pianists at least Grade 5 Royal Conservatory or equivalent.  Students with no previous formal training (self-taught) may be admitted after meeting with the music teacher.

Band involves extensive playing, music theory assignments and tests, class participation and some public performances. This class usually meets at a lunch time slot.

 

MUSIC 10  (VOCAL)

(ACADEMIC credit)

Open to all grade 10 students interested in developing their understanding of singing.  No previous experience is required.  The vocal classes take place outside of the regular daily schedule and include a vocal class and two choir rehearsals per week.  Students will be exposed to proper vocal technique, ear training, music theory and sight reading.  Some public performances will be required as part of the choir.

 

Grade Eleven Courses

 

VISUAL ARTS 11

(ACADEMIC credit)

This course concentrates on refining skills and further developing an understanding of the central components of drawing, painting, sculpture and design, and informal art history.  Students will begin to develop creative problem solving skills and will work more independently.

 

DRAMA 11

(ACADEMIC credit)

Drama 11 builds on learning experiences provided in Drama 10 and focuses on the students’ personal development.  Beginning with foundation experiences to develop student confidence and capability, the course allow students to explore movement and speech and to combine these in a greater range of dramatic forms.  Selected dramatic forms are explored in depth for presentation

 

Drama 11 emphasizes the process of creating script and bringing script to production.  The course also explores the elements of theatre production and the skills required for presentation or performance.

 

MUSIC 11  (BAND)

(ACADEMIC credit)

Offered to students who have participated in band in Grade 10. Students who play "non-traditional" band instruments are also welcome (guitar, piano, strings) provided they have some previous experience or private study.  Guitar players must be at an intermediate level and pianists at least Grade 5 Royal Conservatory or equivalent.  Students with no previous formal training (self-taught) may be admitted after meeting with the music teacher.

Band involves extensive playing, music theory assignments and tests, class participation and some public performances.  This class usually meets at a lunch time slot.

 

MUSIC 11  (VOCAL)

(ACADEMIC credit)

Open to all grade 11 students interested in developing their understanding of singing.  No previous experience is required.  The vocal classes take place outside of the regular daily schedule and include a vocal class and two choir rehearsals per week.  Students will be exposed to proper vocal technique, ear training, music theory and sight reading.  Some public performances will be required as part of the choir.

 

Grade Twelve Courses

 

VISUAL ARTS 12

(ACADEMIC credit)

This course concentrates on specialization, individual problem-solving, working in depth in selected areas of the central program. Continued emphasis is placed on the central components begun in the foundation and second year. Students at this level will be working independently, exploring personal reflection and a variety of media choices.


AP MUSIC THEORY 12

(ADVANCED  credit)

AP Music Theory 12 is designed for students who are considering future music study and/or careers in the music field or who plan for ongoing involvement in music, though they have chosen other career paths.  The course consists of compulsory music-making, music literacy, and global understandings components.  Students will also be required to make a connection with someone currently working in the music field.  These aspects of the course are meant to be focused according to individual plans for future music study/careers.  Students will be required to perform or compose a body of solo or small ensemble work that meets stated technical requirements, work independently to complete music literacy requirements, and complete an independent global music studies project that links directly to the focus of music in their own lives.  In addition, this course consists of self-directed learning projects that students will design, based on the direction that is planned for their post-secondary music involvement.  Students will prepare for and write the AP Music Theory Exam.

 


MUSIC 12  (BAND)

(ACADEMIC credit)

Offered to students who have participated in band in Grade 11.  Students who play "non-traditional" band instruments are also welcome (guitar, piano, strings) provided they have some previous experience or private study.  Guitar players must be at an intermediate level and pianists at least Grade 5 Royal Conservatory or equivalent.  Students with no previous formal training (self-taught) can be admitted after meeting with the music teacher.

Band involves extensive playing, music theory assignments and tests, class participation and some public performances. This class usually meets at a lunch time slot.

 

MUSIC 12  (VOCAL)

(ACADEMIC credit)

Open to all grade 12 students interested in developing their understanding of singing.  No previous experience is required.  The vocal classes take place outside of the regular daily schedule and include a vocal class and two choir rehearsals per week.  Students will be exposed to proper vocal technique, ear training, music theory and sight reading.  Some public performances will be required as part of the choir.

 

ADDITIONAL MUSIC OPPORTUNITIES

Students may audition for all-city ensembles at the Fine Arts Department.  Students wishing to take part in any all-city ensemble must also belong to their school ensembles.  Ensembles offered include: soundtrax, Youth Honour Choir, Halifax Schools Symphony Orchestra, Intermediate and Senior Jazz Band, improvisation classes and various instrumental ensembles.  Please check with your music teacher.


BUSINESS EDUCATION

Business Education is a related and integral part of the total program of education in our high school.  Business Education not only provides effective occupational instruction for high school students desiring careers in business, but also makes an important contribution to the comprehensive education of all high school students.

Business Education courses may be taken by any student as part of the high school completion program.

 

Grade Ten Courses

 

BUSINESS 10

(OPEN credit)

This course has four main components:  introductory business concepts, introduction to entrepreneurship, the organization and operation of school-based ventures, and the use and application of technology for research, analysis, and presentations.  Students will learn how a business operates, what makes a successful entrepreneur, how accounting principles are used as business and personal planning tools, and participate in class entrepreneurial activities.  This course is valuable to any student with an interest in business and to students who wish an introduction to further business courses.

 

Grade Eleven Courses

 

ACCOUNTING 11

(ACADEMIC credit)

The aims of the high school accounting courses are:

1.to develop an understanding of accounting principles and concepts encountered in business      and personal activities;

2.  to provide a sound foundation for additional study beyond the high school level;

3.  to become familiar with the applications, principles and importance of data processing in          accounting procedures.

The following topics are covered in the introductory course: accounting for starting a business; analysis of business transactions and how they affect the business records; the use of accounting records such as journals, ledgers, and source documents; processing and control of cash receipts and payments; preparation of reports to management; procedures required in merchandising businesses; payrolls; year-end accounting activities and many other items which keep the student interested and involved.

Accounting 11 is available to Grade 10 students as an elective.

 

Grade Twelve Courses

BUSINESS MANAGEMENT 12

(ACADEMIC credit)

This exciting new course introduces students to business management concepts through the use of technology.  Unit 1 provides an overview of the current business environment and introduces students to business terminology and concepts.  Unit 2 provides an in-depth analysis of management roles and responsibilities.  Students will relate their own personal attributes, skills, and knowledge to management functions (leadership, planning, decision-making, organizing and controlling) as well as to different management styles.  Unit 3 presents challenges facing 21st century managers such as ethics, knowledge management, organizational change, and adapting to the rapid pace of technological innovation.  Unit 4 is an independent project in which students select a specific industry and design their own company with a focus on management.  Note:  This course involves regular computer use for research and design.

 

LAW 12

(ACADEMIC credit)

The Canadian law course is designed to provide students with a knowledge of law and its function in society and the opportunity to develop skills and attitudes that will enable them to understand the process of law.  Topics include the Canadian legal system, crimes and crime control, injuries and wrongs, human rights, property rights, promises and agreements, business relations, family relations, and courts and trials.

 

INVESTMENT AND FINANCE 12

(ACADEMIC credit)

Investment and Finance 12 (academic) will give students the opportunity to become financially literate citizens who can confidently manage their money.  Students will learn how to build an investment portfolio, how to make their money grow and how to avoid investment mistakes.  Students will learn to set financial goals and to become familiar with the Canadian banking system.  They will accomplish this through independent research, team projects and presentations.  This course will help students become adults who are comfortable managing the various aspects of money - whether spending, saving, investing or giving back.

Prerequisite: Successful completion of Mathematics 10

Recommended Prerequisite:  Successful completion of Mathematics 11.

 

 


ENGLISH LANGUAGE ARTS

 

Grade Ten Courses

ENGLISH 10

(ACADEMIC credit)

English 10 emphasizes proficiency in using oral language for a variety of purposes.  Learning experiences include the following:

·         Exploratory and informal talk: conversation, focused discussion with an identifiable purpose, such as brainstorming, speculating, and problem solving.

·         Structured activities, including symposia, panels, and interviews.

·         Dramatic representations:  monologues, role playing, and improvisation.

·         Performance of texts:  individual and choral performance and Readers Theatre.

·         Formal presentations:  seminars, debates, public speaking, and reports.

·         Focused listening activities to interpret and evaluate ideas and information from a range of sources

Basic skills in writing and interpreting literature are important aspects of this entrance level in English.  Students will begin to apply their writing skills to producing formal and informal essays.

Options are available for students wishing additional support or enrichment.

 

Grade Eleven Courses

 

ENGLISH COMMUNICATIONS 11

(GRADUATION credit)

English/Communications courses are intended for students who may need additional support in their development as readers, writers, and language users.  This course focuses on developing language skills necessary for the workplace.  Learners must also have opportunities to read widely in their interest areas and to create both written and visual texts to enhance their reading and writing fluency.  The use and the influence of media such as television, radio, and film are also examined in this course.

 

ENGLISH 11

(ACADEMIC credit)

English 11 is intended for students whose goals include post-secondary study.  Learning experiences should enable students to:

·         Study and give detailed accounts of complex and sophisticated texts and issues.

·         Be perceptive and analytical in making sophisticated adult judgements.

·         Be critical readers of literary texts

·         Be critical viewers

·         Express themselves precisely when writing for often complex purposes

·         Be capable editors of their own and others’ writing.

·         Communicate confidently and effectively in the formal style and language required by some situations.

·         Demonstrate control of language processes.

 

 

 

 

ADVANCED ENGLISH 11 (Pre AP)

(ADVANCED credit)

This is a very demanding course which puts emphasis on historical literature and on the development of language itself. Selected texts transcend various cultures and time periods. The usual focus on writing and speaking is continued here, with increased emphasis on the development of the argument. Students will also have opportunities to write imaginatively.

Prerequisite: strong interest, willingness to apply oneself and the recommendation of the Grade 10 teacher.  Students planning to take AP English 12 should take Advanced English 11 (Pre AP).

 

Grade Twelve Courses

 

ENGLISH COMMUNICATIONS 12

(GRADUATION credit)

This course is a high school completion course for students who are looking towards career and educational options other than university.  All students will work toward the same outcomes in their Grade 12 year but English 12 and English Communications 12 will differ in terms of pace, scope, emphases and resources. The emphases are on accurate and effective communication and the reading, viewing and studying of a wide variety of texts.

 

ENGLISH 12

(ACADEMIC credit)

English 12 is intended for students whose goals include post-secondary study.  Learning experiences should enable students to:

·         Study and give detailed accounts of complex and sophisticated texts and issues.

·         Be perceptive and analytical in making sophisticated adult judgements.

·         Be critical readers of literary texts

·         Be critical viewers

·         Express themselves precisely when writing for often complex purposes

·         Be capable editors of their own and others’ writing.

·         Communicate confidently and effectively in the formal style and language required by some situations.

·         Demonstrate control of language processes.

 

ADVANCED PLACEMENT ENGLISH 12

(ADVANCED credit)

AP English is a rigorous course that is designed to take students beyond the English 12 outcomes to prepare students to meet the requirements for university credit.  AP English will meet the needs of students who are interested in the study of language and literature through close readings of a variety of texts that span the globe and major literary eras.  The expectation is that students have a desire to read widely and consistently throughout the year in preparation for the AP Exam in May.

Prerequisite:  Recommendation of Advanced English 11 teacher (Pre AP)

 

 

 

 

 

 

ENGLISH 12 AFRICAN HERITAGE

(ACADEMIC credit)

English 12 African Heritage examines texts with a focus on African Heritage, including short fiction, novels, poetry, spoken word and various elements of African oral traditions.  The course views literature through a historical lens, spanning from prehistoric Africa throughout slavery, into reconstruction and renaissance, and then to the civil rights era.  This course fulfills the grade 12 English language arts requirement for graduation, and like all students enrolled in English 12, students in English 12 African Heritage write the academic English 12 provincial examination.


 

FAMILY STUDIES, PERSONAL DEVELOPMENT AND CAREER EXPLORATION

 

Family Studies prepares the student for life as well as providing a grounding for many courses in post-secondary institu­tions, including careers involved in the health services and profes­sions.

 

Grade Ten Courses

 

FOOD FOR HEALTHY LIVING 10

(OPEN half credit)

Food for Healthy Living 10 (Open) is a half-credit course that is combined with International Foods 10.  Energy, growth, and health are affected by healthy food choices.  Students plan and prepare meals that complement healthy life choices.  The course explores how life choices and food availability affect diet, and students will learn to identify nutrition issues that require dietary modifications.  The impact of food marketing and advertising on people’s food choices is addressed.

 

INTERNATIONAL FOOD 10

(OPEN half credit)

International Foods 10 (Open) is a half-credit course that is combined with Food for Healthy Living 10.  Students “travel” on a virtual global foods tour exploring diverse historical, geographical, cultural and nutritional components of international cuisine.  The course includes discussions with community guest speakers, demonstrations, and food tasting experiences.  Students examine global food issues affecting individuals, families and communities locally and around the world.

 

CAREER DEVELOPMENT 10

(OPEN credit)

Career Development 10 is designed to help students to understand and manage themselves, to manage their personal lives and resources (including financial resources), and to develop the ability to organize and shape their careers.

 

Students in Career Development 10 develop their abilities to communicate, think, and deal with their feelings.  They explore realistic personal goals, assess their own abilities, and realize how these actions affect their learning and decision-making processes.  They develop awareness of their place in the community and the value to their personal growth of giving service to the community.

 

Career Development 10 consists of the following modules:

bullet Module 1:  Personal Development
bullet Module 2:  Career Awareness
bullet Module 3:  Workplace Readiness
bullet Module 4:  Financial Management
bullet Module 5:  LifeWork Portfolio

 

LIFE/WORK TRANSITIONS 10

(OPEN credit)

Life/Work Transitions 10 will help students to understand the relationship between their high school studies and a range of post-secondary destinations.  The course focuses on examining career options, making choices, exploring the workplace, and developing employability skills.  Learning modules for this course include the following:  Fundamentals of Life/Work:  Planning for a Changing World; Workplace Readiness; A Life/Work Simulation; Employability Portfolio; and Independent or Group Project.

 

Grade Eleven Courses

 

CHILD STUDIES 11

(OPEN credit)

Child Studies is a full credit course designed to explore the meaning and implications of responsible parenthood, to acquire current information regarding reproduction, pregnancy and child­birth, to explore significant issues of early childhood, and to apply the understanding of child development to the care and guidance of children.  The course is developed around five modules:

·         Decisions about Parenthood.

·         The Beginning of Parenthood

·         Early Childhood Development

·         Special Concerns in Child Development

·         Practical Experiences with Children

 

CAREER DEVELOPMENT 11

(HALF credit)

Career Development 11 is designed to help students continue to develop and refine a career and life plan which was begun in Career Development 10.  Students refine their understanding of, and readiness for, the world of work and extend their skills in personal financial management.

 

Career Development 11 consists of the following modules:

bullet Module 1:  Career Awareness
bullet Module 2:  Work Cultures
bullet Module 3:  Financial Management
bullet Module 4:  LifeWork Portfolio

 

WORKPLACE HEALTH AND SAFETY 11

(HALF credit)

Workplace Health and Safety 11 is a course in which students receive training in the Workplace Hazardous Systems Information System, and complete certification in Emergency level First Aid, and Occupational Health and Safety online training.  Online safety learning tools, including Passport to Safety, are used.

 

Workplace Health and Safety 11 consists of the following modules:

bullet Module 1:  Fundamentals of Workplace Health and Safety
bullet Module 2:  Workplace Hazards, awareness and Control

 

Career Development 11 and Workplace Health and Safety must be taken together.

TOURISM 11

(ACADEMIC course)

This course is designed for students who are interested in the hospitality/tourism industry.  The course focuses on career planning and employability skills and on industry design and development (for example, develop a plan for eco-tourism in South America).  Students apply and expand their learning in community or workplace settings through job shadowing, field trips, and work experience.  Learning experiences have a strong applied focus with an emphasis on integrating, applying, and reinforcing learning in other courses.

 

Grade Twelve Courses

 

CANADIAN FAMILIES 12

(OPEN credit)

Canadian Families 12 is a one-year course designed to develop an understanding of the nature of families in historical, social, and cultural contexts; to promote awareness of the role played by economics, work, and shelter in maintaining successful families; and to examine the physical, social, and emotional dimensions of family health in adopting a preventive approach to family well-being.  Throughout the course students will explore the evolving family and its role in society.  Students will research the challenges faced by today’s Canadian families and look at society’s response to those challenges which include employment, consumerism, and providing basic needs of shelter, food and nurturing throughout years.  Related career opportunities will be researched in each module.

 

This course is developed around six modules:

 

Module 1:  Images of Families

Historical and cultural perspectives, families today, family law, families of the future, impact of technology

 

Module 2:  Family Development

Relationships, family arrangements, parenting

 

Module 3:  Families in Later Life

Senior living, family needs and roles

 

Module 4:  Family Well-Being

Family health, family and community, support systems, coping with change.  Students will participate in a community service learning initiative.

 

Module 5:  Family and the Economy

Work, Consumerism, Money Management

 

Module 6:  The Family and Shelter

Housing from a sociological perspective, meeting shelter needs, community concerns and support services related to available, affordable, safe shelter

 

COOPERATIVE EDUCATION

Cooperative Education involves methods of learning that links school and the workplace through an active relationship between students, teachers, parents and community. Co-operative Education provides the opportunity for a student to earn a high school credit when taken in conjunction with his/her other courses. The program integrates in-school courses with a 100 hour out of school placement and a 25 hour in-school component. The program enriches, enhances and reinforces knowledge and skills as the student integrates school subjects and workplace learning. To complete a community placement, students must be of 16 years of age.

 

Co-operative Education consists of 3 components:

bulletIn-school component
bulletCommunity placement
bulletReflective learning

 

The in-school component is structured to prepare students for the community placement. . The community placement component for each student must be carefully designed through co-operation between the school staff and the work place host. The community placement must be monitored on a regular basis and carefully evaluated, making use of the student's learning assessment and evaluation plan. The learning plan must clearly indicate the goals and objectives of the community placement.

 

Reflective learning sessions are held on a regular basis throughout the school year, providing students with an opportunity, in an individual or group setting, to reflect on their community placement experience, to make specific connections between the community placement experience and the related courses, and to expand on the material learned in the classroom. Students complete a portfolio and a reflective report or essay. These activities are an integral part of all work education programs, however, they are emphasized and developed to a greater degree in Co-operative Education credit courses.
FRENCH SECOND LANGUAGE

 

CORE FRENCH

 

CORE FRENCH 10, CORE FRENCH 11, AND CORE FRENCH 12

(ACADEMIC 1 credit each)

The senior high French program is designed to develop comprehension, communication, and interaction skills and strategies through experiential teaching materials that incorporate a variety of authentic documents.  Topics, tasks, and final projects are aligned with students’ experiences and interests.  Areas to study include the future, career plans, the media, the arts, social and technological trends, as well as Francophone cultures and multiculturalism.

 

FRENCH IMMERSION LANGUAGE ARTS

 

FRANCAIS-IMMERSION 10

(ACADEMIC credit)

This immersion course emphasizes using French for a variety of purposes. Students are engaged in listening and speaking situations and in responding to a variety if texts. Literature includes articles, poems, mythology, short stories and novels. Writing activities include composing documents to present information and to express feelings. The course also explores other forms of viewing and representing.

 

FRANCAIS-IMMERSION 11

(ACADEMIC credit)

In the grade 11 French immersion course, students continue to listen and respond to a variety of texts and to communicate orally information on various topics. Students are involved in such activities as drama and improvisation. Reading and literature include articles, biographies, poems, short stories and novels. Writing activities include letters, tales, short stories, reports and research papers. The course also explores other forms of viewing and representing.

 

FRANCAIS-IMMERSION 12

(ACADEMIC credit)

In grade 12 French immersion students continue to develop their listening and oral skills in French while engaged in a wide range of activities. Reading and literature include many forms and genres, such as articles, position papers, poetry, legends, short stories, novels and drama. Students write informative reports, research papers and briefs. The course also explores other forms of viewing and representing. 


MATHEMATICS

 

The study of Mathematics is important for academic and career success.  Upon graduation from high school students should be confident in their ability to communicate and reason mathematically.  They should be able to use problem solving techniques to investigate and make decisions about everyday tasks. 

 

The NS Department of Education has adopted a new mathematics curriculum.  All incoming grade 10 students will be taking courses based on this new curriculum.  The revised Nova Scotia senior high mathematics program will include the following four pathways with corresponding topics:

 

bulletMathematics Essentials (graduation credits)
bulletMathematics at Work (graduation credits)
bulletMathematics (academic credits)
bulletPre-Calculus (advanced credits)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

These new courses will be implemented as follows:

bulletGrade 10 courses, 2013–2014
bulletGrade 11 courses, 2014–2015

·         Grade 12 courses, 2015–2016

 

 

Students in grades 11 and 12 will continue to take the existing mathematics courses at the grade 11 and 12 level. 

 


The chart below shows typical math routes in high school fro grade 11 and 12 students:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Grade Ten Courses

 

In 2013–14 three mathematics courses will be available at the grade 10 level:

         Mathematics Essentials 10: (110 hours), 1 graduation credit

         Mathematics at Work 10: (110 hours), 1 graduation credit

         Mathematics 10: (220 hours), 2 academic credits

 

Mathematics Essentials 10

(graduation, 1 credit)

 

This course will be presented as a 110-hour course.

 

Mathematics Essentials 10 is an introductory high school mathematics course designed for students who do not intend to pursue post-secondary study or who plan to enter programs that do not have any mathematics pre-requisites.

 

Mathematics Essentials courses are designed to provide students with the development of the skills and understandings required in the workplace, as well as those required for everyday life at home and in the community. Students will become better equipped to deal with mathematics in the real world and will become more confident in their mathematical abilities.

 

The typical pathway for students who successfully complete Mathematics Essentials 10 is Mathematics Essentials 11 followed by Mathematics for the Workplace 12.

 

Students in Mathematics Essentials 10 will explore the following topics:

mental math, working and earning, deductions and expenses, paying taxes, making purchases, buying decisions, probability, measuring and estimating, transformation and design, and buying a car.

 

 

Mathematics at Work 10

(graduation, 1 credit)

 

This course will be presented as a 110-hour course.

 

Mathematics at Work 10 is an introductory high school mathematics course which demonstrates the application and importance of key math skills.

 

The new Mathematics at Work courses are designed to provide students with the mathematical understandings and critical-thinking skills identified for direct entry into the work force or for entry into programs of study that do not require academic mathematics.

 

The typical pathway for students who successfully complete Mathematics at Work 10 is Mathematics at Work 11 followed by Mathematics at Work 12. Some students who successfully complete Mathematics at Work 10 may choose to take Mathematics Essentials 11 followed by Mathematics for the Workplace 12.

 

Students in Mathematics at Work 10 will explore the following topics:

measurement, area, Pythagorean theorem, trigonometry, geometry, unit pricing and currency exchange, income, and basic algebra.

 

 

Mathematics 10

(academic, 2 credits)

 

This course will be presented as a 220-hour course. This will mean that students will have mathematics class every day for their grade 10 year.

 

Mathematics 10 is an academic high school mathematics course which is a pre-requisite for all other academic and advanced mathematics courses. Students who select Mathematics 10 should have a solid understanding of mathematics from their junior high years. This means that students would have demonstrated satisfactory achievement of learning outcomes in grade 9 mathematics.

 

Note: Mathematics 10 is a 220-hour, two-credit course.

 

All students following the academic or advanced pathway will need to take Mathematics 10 followed by Mathematics 11. These courses are to be taken consecutively, not concurrently.

There are two typical pathways for students who successfully complete Mathematics 10:

 

For those students intending to follow the academic pathway, Mathematics 10 will be followed Mathematics 11 and then Mathematics 12. (Mathematics 11 and Mathematics 12 are designed to provide students with the mathematical understandings and critical-thinking skills identified for post-secondary studies in programs that do not require the study of theoretical calculus).

 

For those students intending to follow the advanced pathway, Mathematics 10 will be followed by Mathematics 11, then Pre-Calculus 11 and Pre-Calculus 12.

 

Alternatively, students who successfully complete Mathematics 10 may choose to select a graduation credit in grade 11.

 

Students in Mathematics 10 will explore the following topics:

measurement systems, surface area and volume, right triangle trigonometry, exponents and radicals, polynomials, linear relations and functions, linear equations and graphs, solving systems of equations, and financial mathematics.

 

Grade Eleven Courses

 

Mathematics Essentials 11

(GRADUATION credit)

Math Essentials 11 is a continuation of Math Essentials 10.  Topics include constructing and interpreting graphs, collecting and organizing data, banking transactions and saving money, investing money, housing options, budgeting,  borrowing money, and designing in 2 and 3 dimensions. Mathematics Essentials 10 and 11 satisfy the two mathematics credit requirements for graduation.

Prerequisite:  Successful completion of Mathematics Essentials 10, Math Foundations 10 or Mathematics 10.

 

Mathematics Foundations 11

(GRADUATION credit)

This course continues the emphasis on the use of technology rather than algebraic skills begun in Mathematics Foundation 10. Topics to be covered include: Making decisions in consumer math, linear programming, trigonometry with an emphasis on applications, statistics with an emphasis on the normal curve and standard deviation.

Prerequisite: Successful completion of Mathematics Foundations 10 or Mathematics 10.

 

Mathematics 11

(ACADEMIC credit)

The focus in this course is on applications of mathematics in a variety of disciplines. Content areas include applications of trigonometry to non-right-angled triangles; a thorough exploration of trigonometric functions and equations using the transformational approach, modeling sinusoidal relationships, trigonometric identities; an exploration of linear systems in 2 and 3 dimensions using technology, as well as algebraic and geometric representations.  Statistics focusing on sampling will also be covered.

Prerequisite: Successful completion of Mathematics 10.

 

Advanced Mathematics 11 (Pre AP)

(ADVANCED credit)

This course covers the topics noted in the description of Mathematics 11 above. In addition, students study statistics with emphasis on confidence intervals and chi-square. The emphasis in this advanced course is on developing greater proficiency in algebraic manipulation, logical reasoning skills, and problem solving. To this end, topics will be studied in greater depth and breadth and assignments will be more challenging than in Math 11. 

Prerequisite: Successful completion of Mathematics 10 and demonstrated outstanding performance in relation to the learning outcomes prescribed for Mathematics 10.

 

Grade Twelve Courses

 

Mathematics Foundations 12

(GRADUATION credit)

The topics in Math Foundations 12 will be explored with an emphasis on technology including the graphing calculator and personal computer. Topics to be covered include sequences (patterning), quadratic functions and its applications, exponential growth and its applications in finance, circle geometry and probability. The emphasis will be on interpreting and applying patterns using appropriate technology and mathematical models.

Prerequisite: Successful completion of Mathematics Foundations 10 or Mathematics 10

Recommended Prerequisite:  Successful completion of Mathematics Foundation 11 or Mathematics 11.

 

Mathematics 12

(ACADEMIC credit)

The outcomes for this course relate to the following content areas: a thorough study of quadratic relationships including sequences, applications and problem solving; exponential growth including applications and problem solving; circle geometry and probability including simulations. Through the use of the TI-83 graphing calculator, mathematical concepts and patterns in these content areas will be explored and algebraic skills will be developed.

Prerequisite: Successful completion of Mathematics 10

Recommended Prerequisite:  Successful completion of Mathematics 11.

 

Advanced Mathematics 12 (Pre AP)

(ADVANCED credit)

Topics to be covered are similar to those covered in Mathematics 12 with the addition of the study of ellipses and binomial expansions. There is a greater emphasis on algebraic skills, reasoning and proof and on problem solving. Topics are covered in greater depth and breath.

Prerequisite: Successful completion of Mathematics 10 and demonstrated outstanding performance in relation to the learning outcomes prescribed for Mathematics 10.

Recommended Prerequisite:  Successful completion of Advanced Mathematics 11(Pre AP).

 

Pre-Calculus Mathematics 12 (Pre AP)

(ADVANCED credit)

This course is intended for students who will be taking Calculus at a post-secondary institution. The learning outcomes are organized around the following content areas: sequences and series; polynomial, rational, irrational, piece-wise, exponential and logarithmic functions and equations; trigonometric functions, equations and identities; and complex numbers. The course builds on strength in the areas of algebraic skill and manipulation, mathematical conceptualization, problem solving, modeling real world phenomena, and logical reasoning and proof developed in the prerequisite courses.

Prerequisite: Successful completion of Advanced Mathematics 11 (Pre AP) and Advanced Mathematics 12 (Pre AP) or Successful completion of Mathematics 11 and Mathematics 12 and demonstrated very good to outstanding performance in relation to the learning outcomes prescribed for Mathematics 11 and Mathematics 12.

 


Advanced Placement Calculus 12

(ADVANCED credit)

This course is designed for those students who wish to build a foundation in the study of calculus prior to taking a course at the university level. The concepts of a limit, derivative, definite integral and indefinite integral will be developed numerically, graphically, verbally, algebraically and in context. Students will construct the fundamental properties of derivatives; explore derivatives of trigonometric, exponential and logarithmic functions; and apply the processes to curve sketching, related rates, and optimization problems. The study of differential equations and the area under the curve will evolve into The Fundamental Theorem of Calculus. Applications will include areas between curves, volumes of solids, and lengths of curves.

Prerequisite: Successful completion Pre-calculus Mathematics 12 (Pre AP).


PHYSICAL EDUCATION

 

The general goals of the program are to have participating students:

bulletdevelop an understanding of the importance of personal physical fitness
bulletdevelop an enjoyment and appreciation of lifelong involvement in physical activity
bulletincrease skill levels, knowledge and leadership in a variety of physical activities
bulletprovide opportunities for social growth and interaction through participation in a variety of activity related settings

 

Course structure:

The PHE 10 and PHE 11 curriculum is divided into seven categories.  The outcomes are progressive and sequentially based as students move from grade to grade.

 

1.  Personal Fitness

The focus will be on a way of life that values physical activity and its integration into daily routines.  Students will participate in activities that promote well-being and a personal level of physical fitness (e.g., skipping, resistance training, flexibility training).

 

2.  Physical Activity and Society

Sport history and culture will be presented as a basis for studying today’s trends in physical activity and wellness (e.g., Olympics, sport history in Nova Scotia, etc.).

 

3.   Personal and Group Safety

Risk management, safety procedures and the proper use of equipment will be incorporated into day-to-day activities.

 

4.   Sport Science

Human anatomy, basic physiology and sport specific care and prevention of injury will be introduced (e.g., identifying muscle groups, bones and their function, sprains, etc.).

 

5.   Outdoor Pursuits

Emphasis will be placed on: developing safety, survival and orienteering skills; developing an appreciation for low impact camping; and, selecting proper equipment for wilderness tripping (e.g., winter camping, canoeing, cross-country skiing, etc.).

 

6.   Leadership

The focus will be leadership styles and the Experiential Learning Cycle.  Students will experience individual and cooperative problem-solving skills during participation in a variety of initiatives (e.g., ice breakers, initiative tasks, trust activities, service learning project).

 

7.  Sport Experience

The focus will be on refining and executing sport specific skills during drills and modified games. Traditional and non-traditional games and sports will be examined (e.g., volleyball, football, dance, omniken ball, etc.).

 

 

 

 

PHYSICAL EDUCATION 10

(OPEN Credit)

This course will provide students with a variety of fitness and sport experiences to enhance their understanding of personal fitness and growth.  Physical Education 10 includes some theory components, coupled with predominately active experiences whereby students will have the opportunity to participate in a variety of outdoor and indoor fitness, sport, and recreational experiences.  The emphasis of this curriculum is to provide students with experiences that require them to take and reflect on their personal responsibility for active, healthy living now and throughout life.  The course is divided into four modules: Outdoor Pursuits (examples:  mountain biking, canoeing, skateboarding, GPS activities…), Exercise Science, Personal Fitness and Leadership.

 

PHYSICALLY ACTIVE LIVING 11

(OPEN credit)

This full-credit course is designed to engage students in a wide range of physically active experiences, with an overall theme of exploring options and opportunities for being active for life, both in school and in their community.  Physically Active Living 11 encompasses both an activity component and a theory component, with an emphasis on engagement in physical activity.

 

The activity component of the course is designed to provide opportunities for students in active experiences that engage youth in traditional and non-traditional forms of physical activity.

 

The theory component of the course will enhance student understanding of healthy eating, injury prevention, mental and emotional health, and addiction prevention highlighting the connection between healthy living and being physically active.

 

PHYSICAL EDUCATION 11

(OPEN credit)

This physical education course places greater emphasis on lifetime recreation activities, with a balance between indoor and outdoor activities.  Physical fitness and the development of leadership skills continue as priorities.

 

PHYSICAL EDUCATION LEADERSHIP 12

(ACADEMIC credit)  Recommended for Grade 12 level students.

This course is set up to include theoretical, organizational and practical components.  Classroom sessions will be directed toward the understanding of “group dynamics” and the development of planning and organizational skills.  Throughout the year, students will participate in assisting school-based functions (e.g., cheerleading competition, intramurals, etc.) and will develop and organize their own community/school service project(s) as part of their evaluation.  In addition, students will be involved in Outdoor Education trips as well as other activities within the gymnasium to satisfy the practical component of their evaluation.  Some experiences are minor while others require teamwork and a commitment to success.

This course is designated students who like to be active, enjoy working in a group setting and are willing to take responsibility for enhancing the learning of their fellow “Leaders”.


SCIENCE

 

Grade Ten Courses

 

SCIENCE 10

(ACADEMIC credit)

The Science 10 course is designed to introduce students to the relationships among science, technology and society. The course will allow students to develop an understanding of the many ways that Science touches their lives and shapes their world.  Science 10 will present students with the tools necessary to become scientifically and technologically literate, and will provide a foundation for further study in various science disciplines.  The four modules of study are Sustainability of Ecosystems, Chemical Reactions, Weather Dynamics, and Motion. 

All students entering Grade 10 should register for Science 10.  Options are available for students wishing support or enrichment.

 

SCIENCES 10 IMM

(ACADEMIC French Immersion credit)

See SCIENCE 10 for course description

 

Grade Eleven Courses

 

BIOLOGY 11

(ACADEMIC credit)

The Biology 11 course emphasizes biodiversity, matter and energy for life, and maintaining equilibrium in living systems.  Activity/laboratory work forms an integral part of the course and is generally used to introduce new ideas, followed by classroom discussion to further develop concepts.  Topics include:  biological classification, cell biology, microscopy, and systems of living organisms including respiration, digestion, excretion and circulation.

Recommended Prerequisite: Science 10

 

ADVANCED BIOLOGY 11 (Pre AP)

(ADVANCED credit)

Advanced Biology 11 is an excellent introductory course for those students with an above average interest and ability in science and are considering a career in life sciences. This course is essentially the same as Biology 11 but has a stronger focus on research, project work and independent study.  Classroom work is complimented with activities and laboratory explorations. Topics include: Matter and energy for life, Biodiversity, Interactions among Living Things, and Maintaining dynamic equilibrium through the study of the systems of living organisms including respiration, digestion, excretion and circulation.  This course is recommended for students planning to take AP Biology 12.

Recommended Prerequisite: Science 10

 

BIOLOGIE 11 IMM

(ACADEMIC FRENCH IMMERSION credit)

See BIOLOGY 11 for course description

Recommended Prerequisite: Sciences 10F

 

HUMAN BIOLOGY 11

(GRADUATION credit)

This course will give students a basic understanding of the biology of the human body.  As well as looking at the major human body systems, students will examine the impact that the life choices we make as well as the environment has on the health of these systems.  Emphasis is placed on labs and hands on activities which are then supported by class discussions to help students feel confident in their understanding of the subject.  A number of course assignments will focus student awareness on the needs of their local community.  Topics to be covered include: the skin, diet and nutrition, the digestive system, cardiovascular health, muscles and bones, and the nervous system.

Recommended Prerequisite: Science 10

 

CHEMISTRY 11

(ACADEMIC credit)

Chemistry 11 is de­signed to be an introduction to the fundamentals of chemistry for the science-bound student.  Students will learn about the composition of matter and how one kind of matter can be changed into other kinds of matter.  The topics covered in class are reinforced with laboratory work. Topics covered include: matter, atomic theory, the periodic table, chemical bonding, naming compounds and writing chemical formulae, types of chemical reactions, balancing chemical equations, stoichiometry, and an introduction to organic chemistry.  Organic chemistry is included in this course because it is recommended for students taking Biology 12.

Recommended Prerequisites: Mathematics 10 and Science 10

 

ADVANCED CHEMISTRY 11 (Pre AP)

(ADVANCED credit)

Advanced Chemistry 11 uses a problem-solving approach to the study of chemistry. It emphasizes chemical principles rather than descriptive chemistry and the relationship between experiment and theory. This program is an excellent introduction to chemistry for those students who have an above average interest and ability in science. Topics include:  atomic theory, periodic law, chemical bonding, liquid and solid phases, organic chemistry, naming compounds and writing formulae, mole calculations and chemical equations.

Recommended Prerequisites: Mathematics 10 and Science10

 

OCEANS 11

(ACADEMIC credit)

Oceanography 11 is a multidisciplinary course encompassing such scientific fields as biology, chemistry, physics and geology.  This course explores the relationship between marine organisms in various ocean environments, examines basic chemical principles of seawater, investigates the concepts of waves, tides and currents and their effects on coastlines, and delves into the structures of the ocean bottom involved in the formation of ocean basins and the concept plate tectonics. Emphasis will be placed on the importance of the ocean as a sustainable resource with particular interest in the ocean environment of the Atlantic Provinces.

Recommended Prerequisite: Science 10

 

 


PHYSICS 11

(ACADEMIC credit)

Physics 11 is an introduction to the fundamentals of Physics for the science-bound student.  Topics covered include motion, forces, sound, light and wave theory.  The main focus of the course is a conceptual understanding of the curriculum through classroom demonstrations, discussions, problem solving and lab work.  Measurement, algebra and numerical computation are developed as tools for understanding the world around us.

Recommended Prerequisites:  Mathematics 10 and Science 10

 

ADVANCED PHYSICS 11 (Pre AP)

(ADVANCED credit)

This is an excellent introductory course in physics for students with a particular interest in science and proven ability in mathematics.  The topics include:  1 dimensional motion, Newtonian Mechanics, momentum, collisions, explosions, work, energy, power, wave behavior and the nature of light and sound.  Understanding is developed through classroom demos, problem solving, discussion and lab work.

Prerequisites:  Mathematics 10 and Science 10

 

 

Grade Twelve Courses

BIOLOGY 12

(ACADEMIC credit)

Biology 12 explores continuity of life as a central theme. Students will learn about reproduction and development, and study the homeostatic mechanisms of the nervous and endocrine systems within this context. Other topics include heredity and genetics, biotechnology, and evolution through genetic variation. Lab work, class discussion and project work are stressed. This course is recommended for students considering careers in science or science-related fields [e.g. health professions].

Recommended Prerequisites: Biology 11

 

ADVANCED PLACEMENT BIOLOGY 12

(ADVANCED credit)

AP Biology 12 is a continuation of Advanced Biology 11 (Pre AP).  This course gives students the opportunity to earn a full University Biology Credit while still in High School.  The topics covered are similar to those in Academic Biology 12 but are studied in greater depth.  There is an extensive lab component as well as independent study.  The topics include:  The Cell Cycle, Sexual Reproduction, Mendelian Genetics, Molecular Genetics, Evolution , and the Nervous, Immune and Endocrine Systems as they relate to homeostasis.  The course is recommended for students considering a career in the Life Sciences.

Recommended Prerequisites: Biology 11 or Advanced Biology 11 (Pre AP)

 

CHEMISTRY 12

(ACADEMIC credit)

The Chemistry 12 course is a continuation of Chemistry 11.  Topics include: select Chemistry 11 review, solutions, chemical energy, chemical kinetics, chemical equilibrium, acids and bases, and oxidation and reduction. This course is recommended for students who are considering a career in chemistry or who need chemistry 12 for acceptance into a university program.

Recommended Prerequisites: Chemistry 11

 


ADVANCED PLACEMENT CHEMISTRY 12

(ADVANCED credit)

AP Chemistry 12 is a continuation of Advanced Chemistry 11.  The course gives students the opportunity to earn a full University Chemistry Credit while still in High School.  In addition to the topics covered in Academic Chemistry 12, the AP Chemistry course covers the topics in greater depth and additional topics are included.  Students also engage in a research project and extra open-ended experimentation. Topics include: select Chemistry 11V review, molecular structure, thermo chemistry, chemical kinetics, chemical equilib­rium, acids and bases, oxidation and reduction and bonding in the solid state.  This course is recommended for students who are considering a career in science or engineering, who need Chemistry 12 for acceptance into a university program or those with an exceptionally strong interest in Chemistry.

 Prerequisites: Advanced Chemistry 11(Pre AP) and Mathematics 11

 

GEOLOGY 12

(ACADEMIC credit)

Geology 12 is designed to introduce students to the dynamic processes that have shaped and continue to shape our earth.  From the origin of the Universe to the asphalt under your feet, this course makes students aware of the connections and importance of Geology in their every day lives.  This course is recommended for students who intend to pursue a career in Geology, and is a course that emphasizes field and lab activities, relying on cooperation and observations.  It is therefore also a good general interest course that does not require an extensive science or math background.  Some of the topics include Plate Tectonics, Earth’s Interior, Mineralogy, The Rock Cycle, Forces and Structures, Geological Time, and Mapping.

Recommended Prerequisite: Science 10

 

PHYSICS 12

(ACADEMIC credit)

This course is a continuation of Physics 11. The topics include: motion in two dimensions, projectile and circular motion; mechanics and momentum in two dimensions, electricity and magnetism, atomic structure, spectral analysis, nuclear physics, radioactivity, and nuclear energy.  Also included are some of the exciting developments in Modern physics such as quantum physics, and the wave/particle duality of matter and energy.  This course is recommended for students who have an interest in physics, are considering a career in science or engineering or who need physics 12 for acceptance into a university program.

Recommended Prerequisites:  Physics 11 and Mathematics 11

 

ADVANCED PLACEMENT PHYSICS 12

(ADVANCED credit)

AP Physics 12 gives students the opportunity to earn a full University Physics Credit while still in High School.  The course is a continuation of PHY11V.  The topics covered are the same as in the Physics 12 course with greater depth in some areas and additional topics which include fluid behavior, buoyancy, and an introduction to thermodynamics.  This course is recommended for students who are considering a career in science or engineering, who need physics 12 for acceptance into a university program or those with an exceptionally strong interest in physics.

Recommended Prerequisites:  Advanced Physics 11(Pre AP) and Mathematics 11


SOCIAL STUDIES

 

Grade Ten Courses

 

HISTORY 10

(ACADEMIC credit)

This course, which focuses on ancient/medieval history, allows students to develop an understanding of the concept of civilization by examining the origins of civilization and comparing some civilizations that have contributed to the nature of the modern world.

 

The course has six broad chronological divisions:  The Evolution of Human Beings; The Birth of Civilizations (including Mesopotamia, Egypt, China, Africa, and the Americas); Greece; Rome; The Middle Ages; and The Renaissance and Reformation.

 

HISTOIRE ANCIENNE MED 10 IMM

(ACADEMIC French Immersion credit)

 

See HISTORY 10 for course description

           

Grade Eleven Courses

 

AFRICAN CANADIAN STUDIES 11

(ACADEMIC credit)

This course is an introduction to the experiences of African peoples in North America through the study of history.  Students will gain an overview of African history and the African diaspora (dispersal) to the "New World" with a particular emphasis on the African Nova Scotian experience.  Students will be equipped with a sound understanding of the experiences, local achievements and contributions of people of African descent.  Also, students will discuss the geographical, historical, economic, artistic, literary, political and social experiences, struggles and life stories of a people who have made a significant contribution to world history and culture.  This course is open to all students, and will involve input from the community. 

African Canadian Studies 11 satisfies the  graduation requirement of a Canadian History course at Grade 11.

 

CANADIAN HISTORY 11

(ACADEMIC credit)

The Canadian History 11 course is organized around five continuing or persistent questions in Canada’s history. These are questions of current concerns and have deep historical roots in that previous generations of Canadians have had to address these questions. Their efforts have  shaped the development of Canada and its identity. These questions form the basis for five of the six units in the course: Globalization, Development, Sovereignty, Governance and Justice. The sixth unit, Independent Study, provides students the opportunity to engage in a specific piece of historical research. Historiography and the historical method are central to this course as it examines Canada’s history from the first peoples in North America to the present.

           

 

 

 

HISTOIRE DU CANADA 11 IMM

(ACADEMIC French Immersion credit)

 

See CANADIAN HISTORY 11 for course description

Grade Twelve Courses

 

GLOBAL GEOGRAPHY 12

(ACADEMIC credit)

Global Geography is a grade twelve course which may be used to satisfy the requirement for successful completion of the high school program. It features eight compulsory units which are based on the standard themes and skills of the discipline of geography. These units are: Our Fragile Planet, Environmental Hazards, The Peopled Planet, Feeding the Planet, Global Resources, Urbanization, The Future Planet.

Each unit is based upon a theme the study of which is fundamental to an understanding of our contemporary planetary condition. In combination, the study of these units should help students answer the key question upon which the course is built: “How did the world arrive at its current state at the close of the 20th century ?

 

GLOBAL HISTORY 12

(ACADEMIC credit)

This course, which focuses on global history, examines major themes in the history of the post-World War II era.  Students examine these themes in five compulsory units:  East-West:  The Role of Superpower in the Post-World War II Era; North-South:  The Origins and Consequences of Economic Disparity; The Pursuit of Justice; Societal and Technological Change; and Acknowledging Global Interdependence:  The Legacy of the Twentieth Century.  In their study of these units, students examine history from three perspectives – social, economic, and political – and use the research and inquiry skills of the historian.

 

Throughout their studies, students address the focus question of the course:  “Has humanity emerged into a world whose actions are governed more by interdependence at the global level than by dependence or independence at the national or international level?”  They also propose reasonable answers to the question upon which Nova Scotia’s global studies courses are built:  “How did the world arrive at its current state at the close of the twentieth century?”

 

HISTOIRE PLANETARIE 12 IMM

(ACADEMIC French Immersion credit)

 

See GLOBAL HISTORY 12 for course description

 

ADVANCED GLOBAL HISTORY 12

(ADVANCED credit)

This course examines major historical events in the post World War II era.  In their study of these events, students will use the research and inquiry skills of a historian to examine history from different thematic perspectives and to make and defend personal independent analysis of events in modern history through the use of debate and the formal written thesis.  Themes discussed will include social movements, cultural change, the effects of technological innovation, economic disparity, justice, and global political perspectives.

 

SOCIOLOGY 12 ACADEMIC

(ACADEMIC credit)

This course is designed to familiarize students with the impact society has on individual behaviour.  Students will study a variety of cultures and cultural issues including issues of power and control, racism, crime, and social groups.   Students will also gain a better understanding of the role of a sociologist through the development of a research study.  The course also utilizes a seminar approach in part where students will be expected to present to their peers a topic chosen by the student in consultation with the teacher.  Canadian sociological issues that might be considered include the family, students and schools, poverty, minority groups, women in society, labor and management, conflict, crime in Canada, punishment and rehabilitation, and the future.

 

SOCIOLOGY 12

(OPEN credit)

This sociology course is designed to give an understanding of the basic aspects of sociology.  It allows students to examine Canadian sociological issues and to participate in a local community/sociological project.  Canadian sociological issues that might be considered include the family, students and schools, poverty, minority groups, women in society, labor and management, conflict, crime in Canada, punishment and rehabilitation, and the future.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

TECHNOLOGY RELATED EDUCATION

Technology related courses are designed to satisfy a wide variety of interests and develop skills in trades and technology.  The programs include carpentry, plumbing, electrical, film media, photography, metal work, and green technologies. All courses listed below fulfill the requirements for a technology credit.

 

Grade Ten Courses

 

CONSTRUCTION TECHNOLOGY 10

(OPEN credit)

The construction technology course helps develop in students an understanding of construction technology, of its applications related to the basic human need for shelter, of the organization of construction, and of construction’s impacts on society.  Students will work in groups on activities related to residential dwellings. In performing these assigned tasks students will learn the proper use of equipment, materials and methods required in construction.  Problem-solving activities are an integral part of this course.

 

EXPLORING TECHNOLOGY 10

(OPEN Credit)

This technology course provides students with hands-on activities and introduces them to a broad spectrum of technological concepts.  By the end of the course, successful students are able to use a range of technical applications, integrate technology with other academic disciplines, create devices and systems to satisfy their needs, explain how technology affects society, and use technology in problem-solving situations. EXT 10 gives students the opportunity to explore different types of technology in a classroom and laboratory setting.  Students will be engaged in theoretical, research based class projects, as well as, projects that involve applied skills.  These projects will cover a wide range of technologies including communications technology; energy, power and transportation, engineering and design technologies.

 

SKILLED TRADES 10

(Academic Credit)

Skilled Trades 10 models the realities of working in skilled trades professions.  The traditional classroom is replaced by a Skilled Trades Centre where students get an opportunity to experience the daily challenges of apprentices.  The course provides a unique mixture of classroom and simulated workplace activities.  Working with hand tools used by professional trades people, students complete real construction tasks and building projects.  The course is divided into 4 main areas:  Safety, Skilled Trades Living, Measurement and Calculation, and Tools and Materials.

 

Skilled Trades 10 is a limited enrolment course.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Grade Eleven Courses

 

BUSINESS TECHNOLOGY 11

(ACADEMIC credit)

Business Technology 11 introduces students to a range of business productivity software tools and their application.  Software will include wordprocessor, spreadsheet, and desktop publishing.

 

In Business Technology 11, students develop a basic proficiency in touch keyboarding, integrate touch keyboarding skills with skills in document processing and design, create spreadsheets to manage data, apply the principles and practices of desktop publishing to design and produce documents, and become confident and purposeful users of business productivity software.

 

Business Technology 11 consists of the following modules:

·         Module 1:  Touch Keyboarding

·         Module 2:  Document processing

·         Module 3:  Spreadsheets

·         Module 4:  Desktop publishing

·         Module 5:  Business Technology Fundamentals

 

CONSTRUCTION TRADES 11

(Academic Credit)

Construction Trades 11 is a continuation of Skilled Trades 10.  Students will continue to focus on skills developed in Skilled Trades 10 and will define them in a construction environment.  Trades that will be examined comprise:  carpenters, plumbers, electricians, painters-decorators, floor installers.

 

Working in groups, students will develop skills necessary to work on a construction site.  Based around a capstone project, each student will actively use the skills specific to each of the trades required to complete the project.  Each student will frame, wire, plumb and finish a section of the project.

 

Emphasis will be placed on communications, job-site safety, and professional trade practices.

 

TRANSPORTATION TRADES 11
(Academic credit)
Prerequisite: Skilled Trades 10
 

Transportation Trades 11 will continue to focus on the skills developed in pre-requisite Skilled Trades 10 and will further define them in an automotive environment. Trades that will be examined include Automotive Painter, Automotive Service Technician, Heavy Duty Equipment Technician, Motorcycle Mechanic, Motor Vehicle Body Repairer, Partsperson, and Truck and Transport Mechanic.

 

Students will learn and develop the skills necessary to work in automotive/transportation sector trades.

 

Continuing inside a culture of safety, emphasis will be placed on professional trade practices and the essential employability skills.  Students will anticipate, engage and reflect as they learn.

 

PRODUCTION TECHNOLOGY 11

(OPEN credit)

By the end of the production technology course, students are able to demonstrate the process required to create a product using a variety of materials and methods.  A major unit helps develop an understanding of plumbing technology and its applications related to residential construction. Students will work individually and in groups on tasks related to residential plumbing.  Tasks may include soldering(sweating) copper, toilet and sink repair and installation, ABS fitting and PEX fitting.  In performing these tasks students will learn the proper use of equipment, materials, and methods required in plumbing.  Problem solving activities are an integral part of this course.

 

Grade Twelve Courses

 

PRODUCTION TECHNOLOGY 12

(OPEN credit)

By the end of the production technology course, students are able to demonstrate the process required to create a product using a variety of materials and methods.  A major unit helps develop an understanding of electricity and its applications related to residential construction.  Students will work individually and in groups on tasks related to residential wiring.  Tasks may include installing service panels, lights, switches, and outlets.  In performing these tasks students will learn the proper use of equipment, materials, and methods required in the electrical trade.  Problem solving activities are an integral part of this course.

FILM AND VIDEO 12

(ACADEMIC credit)

Film and Video Production 12 involves students in the production of a film or video.  Students work independently and as part of a production team to explore roles in the film industry, develop skills required in production roles, develop a critical awareness of historical and cultural aspects of film, and work through the process of producing a film or video from script development to final edit.  Modules for this course include Fundamentals, Production Team Skills, Film Industry Disciplines and Careers, and Film Development and Production.

 

MATH FOR THE WORKPLACE 12

(GRADUATION credit)

This course is designed for students looking for a course that will support their transition to NSCC programs requiring a high school graduation diploma.  Most aspects of the course will be directly related to math that is needed in areas such as carpentry, cosmetology, welding, forestry, electrical, plumbing, auto mechanics, electronic technology, refrigeration and masonry.  The course is modular and project oriented to reflect the type of learning that will occur when students move on to NSCC.  There are four modules:  Measurement, Math in the Workplace Investigation, Ratio/Rate/Proportion, and a major project.  This course does not fulfill the compulsory math requirement.

 


MULTIMEDIA 12

(ACADEMIC credit)

Multimedia is a course that will look at the integration of technology into a society and the influences that arise from this integration.  Through personal statements, discussions and readings students will develop an understanding of how media affects our interpretation of past and present events. The course will focus on using various computer programs to illustrate the concepts shared in class through lectures. Written assignments and readings, will also be given as homework. Research and research methodologies will also be explored as a major part of the course for selected assignments.  This course satisfies the technology requirement.

 

BUSINESS TECHNOLOGY 12

(ACADEMIC credit)

Business Technology 12 is a computer technology course designed to provide students with the knowledge and skills necessary to use the computer as a tool to augment academic programs and personal or community endeavors.  The course will emphasize the use of the computer as a learning tool, as a research tool, and involve facilitation of report/letter writing, organization and manipulation of data, problem solving and presentation skills.  The course will make extensive use of word processing, spreadsheet, database and presentation software; use of the Internet as a research tool and the design of web pages.  Students will also learn the components of a microcomputer and how to make informed purchasing decisions.  Students without keyboarding skills will devote the first 20 hours of the course developing a minimum level of keying speed in order to input data more efficiently during the remainder of the course.

 

SKILLED TRADES 12 CO-OP

(ACADEMIC Credit)

In Trades 12 co-operative education courses, students will apply and extend their previous learning in work placements.  Production, analysis, and reflection will be the major learning outcomes.

 

 

 

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